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How we discover How we read

Keeping track of how you discovered books

Goodreads has a poll asking about where you heard about the previous book you read. Here are the results: I voted for “blog post” because I heard about “Shape of Design” from Craig Mod’s post “Hack the Cover.” Although I had to think about it for awhile, because I read a bunch of books at […]

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How we discover How we read

Browsing through eBooks vs. real books

The vast selection of used books in the basement of After-words bookstore makes me appreciate being able to discover books. But it also makes me aware that I don’t purchase physical books anymore. I enjoy the experience of reading books on my iPhone so much that I rarely pick up a real book to read. […]

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How we discover

Metadata for Olympic video

NBC is proclaiming their increased viewership is due to offering so much live video online. While that’s cool, let’s take that a step further. I don’t really care to wake up at 3am to watch a badminton tournament. I want archives. Searchable archives. What I’d like is to be able to tell my iPad, i […]

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How we discover How we read

What’s that book about?

When I scroll through the book titles on my Goodreads.com friend feed, sometimes I wonder, “what’s that book about?” I consider asking the person who is reading the book. But then I realize I could just click on the link and read the official summary. Funny how online stuff works. If a friend tells us […]

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How we discover How we read

Bookstore of the future

What could the bookstore of the future look like? Bethanne Patrick, Executive Editor of Book Riot, asked this question on her blog post, “The Bookstore of the Future, Installment One: What Would Don Draper Handsell?” (hat-tip to @dbsalk for tweeting a link to this post.) I’d love to see specific niche-by-topic bookstores. Like a bookstore […]

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How we discover How we read

Is Google replacing our brains?

Mashable had a fun infographic that talks about how Google is replacing our brains. I would argue that Google is replacing our parts of our memory, not our brains. We can still think about things, we just don’t always have to remember what those things are. Google enables us to be curious about more things. […]